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Churchyard History

Lanner Lawn Cemetery is owned and managed by Council.

The cemetery is tucked beyond the, now ‘closed’ Churchyard, opposite Christchurch in Rough Street. Pedestrian access is via the lychgate, where a few steps and a grass pathway lead you up an incline to the entrance.

Council resolved to offer provision for burial and internment of ashes and after acquisition of the land and suitable preparations, official opening was in 2001.

To offer a place for quiet contemplation a ‘Garden of Reflection’ was created. Complete with soft planting, seating and central focus of a specially commissioned armillary sundial; the inscription invites you to ‘take time to rest and reflect on your joys’. Visitors value this spot which also affords good views across the valley to Carn Marth.

The area is designated as a ‘lawn’ cemetery which aims to achieve a satisfactory standard without excessive cost; the only ornamentation permitted on a grave is in the form of a headstone.  This allows mowing of the grass to be carried out without the need to move extra vases or similar artefacts. We appreciate that many people visiting the grave will wish to express their respect but, unfortunately, the contractor does not have the time to remove and subsequently replace items of this kind. This allows the provision of a cemetery which has a uniform and high standard appearance.

Those wishing to reserve a burial plot within the cemetery are able to do so and purchase can be made for the period of 50 or 100 years. Please see table of fees for applicable charges.

The facility for internment should prove more than adequate for many years to come and an area to extend facilities is almost complete. The creation of a vehicular access, off Rough Street, will facilitate the entrance of a hearse and following cars and a turning head will assist with smooth vehicular movements. The new area affords additional space for burial and aims to offer a dedicated space for Natural Burial too.

If you would like to know more or have any questions please contact the Clerk.

Churchyard

Just opposite Christchurch in Rough Street is the entrance to the Churchyard through the lychgate which was constructed in 1920 as a memorial to those who fell in World War 1. Later, the names of those who fell in World War 2 were added.

The Churchyard was established on 8th August 1911 and by the mid 1970’s no more burials were possible as it was full. The area around the church itself had been closed to burials for some time.

The maintenance of the Churchyard became an impossible task for Christchurch and help was offered initially by ‘Friends of Lanner Churchyard’ and latterly by Lanner Parish Council. This has supported regular grass cutting and in following good practice protected the flora and fauna in the area. In 2019 Christchurch was successful in an application to formally ‘close’ the Churchyard; this means the facility now falls under the protection of Cornwall Council. As part of partnership working the Parish Council continues to cut the grass, with a small remittance from the unitary authority. With support from volunteers, it is work will be extended to cover boundary hedge maintenance, clearance of vegetation encroaching into plots and the relocation of shrubs/bushes.

There are few elaborate headstones in the graveyard and many plots are unmarked, reflecting the relative lack of wealth in the area. There are two war graves for those who served in WWII and two burials of clergy; the latter are easy to spot as in line with protocol the headstones face in the opposite direction. The tradition of never ‘turning one’s back on one’s congregation’ is adhered to!

Unfortunately, there are no official burial records for either of the first two churchyards. There are at least 670 graves in the churchyard and information about burials is available at https://www.cornwallminingvillagechurchyards.net/.

There is a rich biodiversity in the churchyard with a colourful display of bluebells and primroses and fauna include woodpeckers, foxes and many songbirds that enjoy the fruits available from the holly trees!

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